Grocery Store In Dublin Installs A Glass Floor To Reveal The 11th Century House Underneath

A Lidl store in Dublin, Ireland recently surprised its customers by installing a glass floor in one of the isles. And if you’re wondering what’s so special about a glass floor, it was actually installed to give the shoppers a unique glimpse at the 11th century home that was discovered lurking underneath the store during its construction.

In an interview with NPR, Paul Duffy, one of the archaeologists working on the site said that the amazing about the new discovery is that it’s an everyday structure. “It’s somewhere that people live. It’s somewhere that people, you know, sat down in the evening and did a bit of craft work while they were sitting around the fire,” said the man. “It’s a place, you know, you can imagine them laughing and joking or shedding tears over, you know, various things.”

While constructing this Lidl store in Dublin, the workers discovered an 11th century home underneath

Image credits: RTÉ News

In another interview with RTÉ News, consultant archaeologist Linzi Simpson said they were delighted to see the building was found, recognized and presented to the public. “I think it’s really fantastic that Lidl is displaying it right in front of their tills,” added the archaeologist.

A glass floor was installed inside the store to give shoppers a unique glimpse at the home

Image credits: RTÉ News

The customers will also be able to see the remains of an 18th century ‘pit trap’ that used to be a part of the Aungier Street theatre.

The archaeologists were delighted to see the home presented to the public

Image credits: RTÉ News

“The thing that becomes clear when you’re looking at these structures and the conditions that people were living in, you know, they were subject to very violent events and catastrophic plagues,” says Paul Duffy.

There’s also a second glass panel that gives shoppers a view of an 18th-century “pit trap” that used to be a part of the Aungier Street theatre

Image credits: RTÉ News

Image credits: RTÉ News

“But the fact that this structure has been rebuilt not once, but probably twice, it just shows that there was obviously tremendous resilience and fortitude back then,” continued the man. “And, you know, it’s something that it’s obviously still in us. You know, we’re the same people. We’re the same people that they were.”

Image credits: RTÉ News

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